Research Update August 2012

Scientists Pursue Connection between Infectious Disease Afflicting Cattle and Morgellons Disease Affecting Humans

Progress moves forward as more research shows Morgellons disease has a physiologic (physical not mental) basis.

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The Morgellons break through started with the research publication, Filament Formation Associated with Spirochetal Infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons Disease by Marianne Middelveen, a Canadian veterinary microbiologist and Raphael Stricker, MD. The CEHF first announced this news last fall when this peer reviewed publication appeared in the November, 2011 issue of Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257881

Why is this important?

In November, 2011, Middelveen and Stricker reported to have found evidence of a veterinary analog to Morgellons (MD). BDD, an infectious disease which has plagued cattle for decades, has fibers/filaments within their tissue and lesions that were recognized as a match to those found in the controversial disease known as Morgellons (MD) in humans. Studies on fibers/filaments from cattle with the bovine hoof disease and those found in MD suffers provided startling evidence challenging the dermatologists’ unfounded assumption that MD is a psychiatric disorder called “Delusions of Parasitosis”. Anyone who suffers from Morgellons knows how real these symptoms are and how disheartening it is to be told it is all in your head. Although the publication stated that the etiology (cause) of MD was not yet known, the findings by Middelveen and Stricker provided corroborative evidence to support a physiological and, perhaps, infectious etiology, lending a new direction for further research.

Second Study Announced by the CEHF on May 16, 2012

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http://www.omicsonline.org/2155-9554/2155-9554-3-140.pdf

2nd paper heads.jpg Indeed, their second study, Morgellons Disease: A Chemical and Light Microscopic Study, published May, 2012 in the peer reviewed publication, Journal of Clinical & Experimental Dermatology Research, continued this BDD and MD comparison in greater detail. Researchers were able to conduct a more in-depth analysis of dermatological specimens from three Morgellons patients and biopsies from cattle with proliferative late stage BDD. Examinations were conducted by light microscopy, by chemical experiments and by immunohistological testing.

Results of the Study …

These findings confirmed that filaments/fibers from both bovine and human samples were similar in formation at the cellular level and had the chemical and physical properties of keratin. The composition of MD filaments from humans was confirmed to be keratin by immunohistological staining with antibodies specific for human keratins. Fibers from three human patients were found to be biological in origin and are produced by keratinocytes in epithelial and follicular tissues.

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An interesting side note is that researchers Middelveen and Stricker found filaments/fibers associated with MD beneath unbroken skin as well as in lesions, thus, demonstrating they are not self-implanted. This confirms previous research from Dr. Randy Wymore at the OSU-Center for the Investigation of Morgellons Disease.

Why is this important?

The original premise--that MD is physiological is holding up to the test of scientific scrutiny.

Morgellons Study Cited by Faculty of 1000

http://www.thecehf.org/morgellons-study-cited-by-faculty-of-1000.html

The quality and importance of this research is highlighted in Faculty of 1000 Award.

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Faculty of 1000 (F1000) is a global community of over 10,000 experts who select, rate and evaluate the very best articles in biology and medicine. The core mission of the F1000 is to identify and evaluate the most important articles in biology and medical research publications. The organization highlights and brings awareness to significant new research. The selection of Morgellons Disease: A Chemical and Light Microscopic Study places the work in this work in the top 2% of published articles in these fields. It classifies the study as “must read” and is certainly an honor for the entire research team. More information can be accessed at the F1000 website (http://f1000.com/716597867).

Thank You and Congratulations to Our Researchers!!

No one can apply to be considered for this. This research was chosen and recognized on its merits and for the importance it holds worldwide. Everyone at The Charles E. Holman Foundation and from the Morgellons community wish to express our congratulations to Marianne Middelveen, Elizabeth Rasmussen, Douglas Kahn, and Raphael Stricker for this recognition. The award was indeed serendipity.

CELEBRATION!

Wenow have documented, peer reviewed evidence published, corroborating

MD is not Delusions of Parasitosis.

MD, like BBD, has a true physical cause. “ … Because BDD is a disease in which spirochetes have been identified as primary etiologic agents, and spirochetal sero-reactivity has been associated with MD, it is reasonable to assume that spirochetal infection plays an important role in MD... Further immunohistological and electron microscopy studies are needed to solve the mystery of Morgellons …” (Middelveen and Stricker). This points the way to the next step in our research. To paraphrase Paul Harvey, stay tuned in and signed up for the next edition of Keeping You in the Loop …for the “rest of the story.”

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